There is a new bottle and can deposit bill in the works here in New York State. While we wait for the deposit to go from five to ten cents, did you know there is a limit on the amount of cans you can return in one day?

The backyard party season is here and from Buffalo to Albany, New York residents are prepping for graduations, Father's Day and Memorial Day parties. There is a good chance that there will be a large amount of returnable cans and bottle left behind. What do you do with them? Do you recycle, toss or return them?

There are reports that the current New York State can and bottle deposit fees will be going up by a nickle and that means you can soon get ten cents for cans and bottles that you return!

The five cent deposit has been active since 1983 and it may be changing soon. According to reports, "The bill — which is carried by state Sen. Rachel May and Assemblywoman Deborah Glick — would raise the deposit and handling fees, as well as expanding which containers are redeemable".

For example, there are states around the country that charge a $.10 deposit for bottles and cans that is paid back when you bring them to a recycling facility.

Currently, New York State charges a $.05 deposit on cans, bottle and some plastic water bottles as well.

Any sealed bottle, can, or jar less than one gallon composed of glass, metal, aluminum, steel, or plastic

Vermont and Maine currently hold the highest deposit amount at $.15 for wine and liquor.

Any sealed container of four liters or less composed of glass, metal or plastic

LIMITS ON RETURNS IN New York State:

What about that limit? How many cans and bottles can you return at once in New York State? Turns out, there are some limits contained in the New York State deposit law. "All dealers may limit the number of containers accepted from one person to 240 containers per visit or to 240 containers per day, but only if they have a sign posted stating this limit. This sign must also state that any redeemer may make 48 hour advance arrangements to redeem an unlimited number of empty beverage containers. Stores that are not open 24 hours a day do not have to accept containers during the first and last hour of their business day".

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